Tag Archives: Gage Academy

Drum Roll Please

It’s award season, no doubt.  First the Liebster blogging award and now this.   😀

Remember my post from June 12th?  I announced the Best of Gage show here in Seattle and that I had submitted a sculpture – and wooaaahhhh – I WON – 3rd place (sculpture category).

He’s only the 4th sculpture I’ve ever done and my first cat, so I am especially pleased and happy. Here are a few pictures of the winner.

IMG_0220On the Prowl | Ceramic | 2012

DSC_0146 DSC_0145  DSC_0151 DSC_0152 DSC_0155

Seattle – Best of Gage 2013

To everyone who lives in the Seattle area:

Please join us this Friday, June 14th from 6 pm to 9 pm to celebrate the Best of Gage, showcasing drawings, paintings and sculptures by Gage student artists – at Gage Academy of Art in Capitol Hill.  There will be drinks and snacks.  Awards are given in seven categories.  I have submitted a sculptures this year, my first time, wish me luck   🙂

Here a link with details:

http://www.gageacademy.org/events/?page=current&type=16

Last year about 600 people visited the event.

Hope you will drop by and enjoy some art.

First Sculpture

I took a short sculpting class over the summer. I chose Intro to Figure Sculpture with Mike Magrath at Gage Academy. The pictures show my very first sculpture produced during the five week class (15 hours). It’s far from perfect but I’m really fascinated with sculpting. It’s a very complex and captivating process – and still so much to learn.

Women Sitting | Clay | 2012

Her face looks a little bit like a figure from Avatar 🙂 unintentional of course, it’s only roughed in. So are hands and feet, for lack of time/skill at the time. I was very busy just getting her posture right – as I said, it’s a very complex process.

I like her back the best.

Enjoying the view.

 

 

Artistic Anatomy

During spring quarter 2012 at Gage I took a class called Artistic Anatomy. In this class you literally study anatomy as far as it applies to drawing (and consequently also to painting and sculpting). In other words you study the skeleton, muscles, etc. – even hair (direction of hair growth, beard) – you get the idea. However this class was an advanced class for students who already had taken part 1 and part 2 in fall and winter, so I got a little in over my head. It was expected that one already knows most of the anatomy and applies it to life drawing. Thankfully I was not the only one who misjudged the class content and the instructor adjusted his curriculum taking the time at the beginning of each session repeating the material in an abbreviated form and explaining once more the specific parts of the body before we started drawing from the life model.

It was quite a ride, I have to say. The upside is, I tend to work harder when I feel that I’m behind. Also, the instructor did not exactly cut me (or anyone else for that matter) any slack. He was not pleased that he had so many people in class that had not already studied the subject. He was very critical and, without any mercy, took every one of my drawings apart. Sometimes it was hard to take it all in but it helped me to get better. One certainly learns through failure. Towards the end of the quarter I even received an approving nod here or there. During the last session we worked completely independent on a drawing of a man. When the session was over I asked him to tell me what he thought was good or bad about it. He pointed to the knee area of one leg and said, “this area here, that’s actually not bad, well defined,” …and nodding his head in thought, said again, “not bad.”   I know that doesn’t sound like much but coming from him (and considering where I had started 12 weeks earlier) it felt really good to hear 🙂

Here are a couple of my drawings/studies from that class: legs, knee, feet, female full body and a portrait.

Following a construction drawing/study of the knee (my knee in the mirror actually).

The next one is one of my favorites. I had a good session that day and although the arms are not that well defined (ran out of time) I was happy with the result.

And last but not least, a portrait.

 

 

Portrait Drawing

As a follow-up to the blogs about “drawing and sculpting” (posted June and July) here is a portrait that I drew during the last class session of “Beginning Portrait – Drawing and Sculpting”. Remember the point of the class was to enhance your drawing skills through sculpting.

Pencil on Paper | May 2012

Now, in comparison look at the following portrait that I drew during my “Beginning Drawing” class during March 2012 (just a couple of months earlier). The nose and in particular the ear in this drawing are not as well developed as in the above drawing. Partly it was a lack of skill but also a lack of “seeing” things and being able to translate it into 2D. The sculpting truly helped to understand the form better and become better at drawing 🙂

Charcoal on Paper | March 2012

Portrait – Drawing and Sculpting (Ear)

As a follow-up to yesterday’s post – a few construction drawings of the ear and a photo of the sculpted ear:

BTW – the lines around the ear are not supposed to be earrings, they are construction lines demonstrating the shape of the object – and the plane changes,  they show how the form turns in space.

 

 

Portrait – Drawing and Sculpting (Nose)

Last quarter (Spring 2012) I took “Beginning Portrait – Drawing and Sculpting” at Gage (instructor: Suzanne Brooker). One week we drew (from the life model) and the next week we sculpted (from the same model) one particular feature of the head.

The point is to understand the plane breaks, dimensions and relations (of the features) of the face/head. To achieve this we drew so-called construction drawings that show the breaks and then sculpted this part. Sculpting (since it is 3-D) really enhances one’s understanding of the plane breaks and relations of the features to each other and as a result improves one’s drawing skills.

To illustrate here an example of a simple construction drawing from an artistic anatomy book:

And here are a few of my construction drawings of the model’s nose:

And the sculpture – the focus is on the nose, the other features are not really developed, only as much as needed for reference.

I’ll post other features of the head in the next few days.

Thanks for stopping by.